Floridian Aquifer

Our Floridian Aquifer

 

 

Some interesting facts about our Floridian Aquifer System.

  • The Floridan Aquifer is a part of the principal artesian aquifer system and is one of the most productive aquifers in the world.
  • It is composed of carbonate rock. The rocks vary in permeability and the system is thick and widespread.
  • This aquifer system underlies an area of about 100,000 square miles in southern Alabama, southeastern Georgia, southern South Carolina, and all of Florida.
  • The aquifer system provides water for hundreds of thousands of people in smaller communities and rural areas as well as Savannah, Brunswick in Georgia, Tallahassee, Orlando, Jacksonville, and St. Petersburg.
  • In the mid-1980s about 3 billion gallons per day of freshwater was withdrawn from the Floridan for all purposes.
  •  A thick sequence of carbonate rocks of Tertiary age comprise the Floridan aquifer system.
  • The Floridan aquifer system has been defined on the basis of permeability.
  •  The Floridian aquifer is heavily pumped for irrigation and industrial purposes.

 

Florida Aquifer www.hydroflowflorida.com

 Florida Aquifer: Dark blue (deep), and light blue (shallow). Flowing throughout most of the State, this is the underground source of drinking water from almost all of Florida, and it is being contaminated at an unprecedented rate.Some of the inorganic impurities found in Florida’s drinking water include: Aluminum, Arsenic, Barium, Cadmium, Calcium, Chlorine, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Lead, Nickel, Nitrate, Nitrite, Magnesium, Manganese, Silica, Sodium, Sulfate, and Zinc. Fact: Not only does it taste bad, Florida is rated as one of the 5 worst states for drinking water quality. Graphic and Information courtesy of www.hydroflow.com.

 

Florida Aquifer photo: USGS

Florida Aquifer photo: USGS

 

The Floridan aquifer, as opposed to surficial aquifers, is the portion of the principal artesian aquifer that extends into Florida, parts of southern Alabama, southeastern Georgia, and southern South Carolina. In Florida it supplies the cities of Daytona, Flagler Beach, Gainesville, Tampa, Jacksonville, Ocala, Orlando, St. Petersburg, and Tallahassee, several municipalities in South Florida, and numerous rural communities. From Wikipedia-Floridian Aquifer

Transitivity of Upper Floridian Aquifer credit:USGS

Transitivity of Upper Floridian Aquifer credit:USGS

USGS Aquifer Basics

 

Florida Aquifer Cut a Way, Image: SJRWMD

Florida Aquifer Cut a Way, Image: SJRWMD

Carbonate Rock Aquifers

Aquifers in carbonate rocks are most extensive in the eastern United States. Most of the carbonate-rock aquifers consist of limestone, but dolomite and marble locally yield water. The water-yielding properties of carbonate rocks vary widely; some yield almost no water and are considered to be confining units, whereas others are among the most productive aquifers known.

Most carbonate rocks originate as sedimentary deposits in marine environments. Compaction, cementation, and dolomitization processes might act on the deposits as they lithify and greatly change their porosity and permeability.

Carbonote Rocks, Image: Schlumberger

Carbonote Rocks, Image: Schlumberger

However, the principal post depositional change in carbonate rocks is the dissolution of part of the rock by circulating, slightly acidic groundwater. Solution openings in carbonate rocks range from small tubes and widened joints to caverns that may be tens of meters wide and hundreds to thousands of meters in length. Where they are saturated, carbonate rocks with well-connected networks of solution openings yield large amounts of water to wells that penetrate the openings, although the undissolved rock between the large openings may be almost impermeable. Source: USGS Carbonate Rock Aquifers

USGS Carbonate Rock Aquifer

USGS Carbonate Rock Aquifer

 
 

Related Websites:

Protecting Our Water
Water Altas 
EPA
How deep and shallow wells impact the Florida Aquifer.

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